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“Now through the white orchard my little dog
romps, breaking the new snow
with wild feet.
Running here running there, excited,
hardly able to stop, he leaps, he spins
until the white snow is written upon
in large, exuberant letters,
a long sentence, expressing
the pleasures of the body in this world.

Oh, I could not have said it better myself.”

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source: “The Storm,” in Winter Hours: Prose, Prose Poems, and Poems (New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2000), 90.

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medium: Poem

“On the wide level acres of the valley the topsoil lay deep and fertile. It required only a rich winter of rain to make it break forth in grass and flowers. The spring flowers in a wet year were unbelievable. The whole valley floor, and the foothills too, would be carpeted with lupins and poppies. Once a woman told me that colored flowers would seem more bright if you added a few white flowers to give the colors definition. Every petal of blue lupin is edged with white, so that a field of lupins is more blue than you can imagine. And mixed with these were splashes of California poppies. These too are of a burning color—not orange, not gold, but if pure gold were liquid and could raise a cream, that golden cream might be like the color of poppies.”

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source: East of Eden (New York: Penguin Books, 1986), 5.

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medium: fiction

“Time interval is a strange and contradictory matter in the mind. It would be reasonable to suppose that a routine time or an eventless time would seem interminable. It should be so, but it is not. It is the dull eventless times that have no duration whatever. A time splashed with interest, wounded with tragedy, crevassed with joy—that’s the time that seems long in the memory. And this is right when you think about it. Eventlessness has no posts to drape duration on. From nothing to nothing is no time at all.”

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source: East of Eden (New York: Penguin Books, 1986), 73.

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medium: fiction

“His mind makes immense detours. Then he gets lost. And then I am able to bring him back, not because I know any more than he does, or because I am more whole, but because I have a sense of direction in the world of ideas.”

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source: The Diary of Anaïs Nin [Vol. 1 1931–1934] (New York: The Swallow Press, 1966), 158.

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medium: diary

notes: Nin is describing Henry Miller

“If psychoanalysis is going to divest me of all decoration, costume, adornment, flavor, characteristic, then what will be left?”

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source: The Diary of Anaïs Nin (Vol. 1 1931–1934) (New York: The Swallow Press, 1966), 119.

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medium: diary

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