Quotenik
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language

“There is no word in the language for end-of-summer sadness, but the human spirit has a word for it and picks up the first sound of its approach.”

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source: “Cold Weather,” in One Man’s Meat (New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1944), 349.

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medium: essay

notes: White wrote this essay in January 1943.

“Human speech is like a cracked tin kettle, on which we hammer out tunes to make bears dance when we long to move the stars.”

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source: Madame Bovary (London: W. W. Gibbings, 1901), 210.

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medium: fiction

“‘Refudiate,’ ‘misunderestimate,’ ‘wee-wee’d up.’ English is a living language. Shakespeare liked to coin new words too. Got to celebrate it!”

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source: Twitter, 5:38 PM Jul 18, 2010 via web

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medium: social media

“It’s not food if it’s called by the same name in every language. (Think Big Mac, Cheetos, or Pringles.)”

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source: Food Rules (New York: Penguin, 2009), 45.

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medium: nonfiction

“Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.”

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source: recounted by Edith Wharton in A Backward Glance (New York: D. Appleton-Century Company, 1934), 249.

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medium: autobiography

via: Fannie Bushin

“I would imagine that I would only feel at ease in my own language if I was playing mute.”

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source: “Tilda Swinton, The Big Screen’s True Transformer,” interview, Jacki Lyden, NPR, July 4, 2010.

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medium: interview

“In every important way we are such secrets from each other, and I do believe that there is a separate language in each of us, also a separate aesthetics and a separate jurisprudence. Every single one of us is a little civilization built on the ruins of any number of preceding civilizations, but with our own variant notions of what is beautiful and what is acceptable—which, I hasten to add, we generally do not satisfy and by which we struggle to live.”

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source: Gilead (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004), 197.

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medium: fiction

via: The Bronze Medal
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