Quotenik

“‘Carpe diem’ doesn’t mean seize the day—it means something gentler and more sensible. ‘Carpe diem’ means pluck the day. Carpe, pluck. Seize the day would be ‘cape diem,’ if my school Latin serves. No R. Very different piece of advice. What Horace had in mind was that you should gently pull on the day’s stem, as if it were, say, a wildflower or an olive, holding it with all the practiced care of your thumb and the side of your finger, which knows how to not crush easily crushed things…Pluck the cranberry or blueberry of the day tenderly free without damaging it, is what Horace meant—pick the day, harvest the day, reap the day, mow the day, forage the day.”

The Anthologist: A Novel (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2009), 127.
via Whiskey River
Quality Quote Collecting

WHAT I'M READING

May 29

The Blazing World

Siri Hustvedt

Apr 26

The Empathy Exams

Leslie Jamison

Feb 20

Nine Stories

J. D. Salinger

Jan 29

Catcher in the Rye

J. D. Salinger

Jan 23

“Lou was a tai chi master and spent his last days here being happy and dazzled by the beauty and power and softness of nature. He died on Sunday morning looking at the trees and doing the famous 21 form of tai chi with just his musician hands moving through the air.
        Lou was a prince and a fighter and I know his songs of the pain and beauty in the world will fill many people with the incredible joy he felt for life. Long live the beauty that comes down and through and onto all of us.”

about her husband, Lou Reed, published in the East Hampton Star, October 31, 2013. Full obit here.

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